Sunday, May 18, 2008

Youth of Today

Our youth don't take education seriously, they are only interested in things that are not necessary, things that destroy their lives, loose respect. Given free education and lots of rights but instead they abused all those right {right for prevention} they don't use condoms, they just go for abortion without notifying their parents, parents are the one who are abused. We are trying by all means as teachers to show them how important is to have something that won't be taken from you {Degree}. But they don't lesson , instead tell you that number of people out there are reach and they are not educated. My worry now is how is going to be South Africa in 20 years to come, because our youth have loose appetite on what is called education. Our tomorrow leaders will be embarrassment. They beat teachers, fighting having guns and knifes in their pockets. South Africa what is happening to you?

2010 Around the Corner

We are all happy about 2010, because we believe that there will be a lot of change for example unemployment rate is going to drop down. But there are problems that we did at problems like crime in our country, we thought that may be it will already be down , but instead it is going higher and higher. My big problem now is who is going to risk about his/her life and come to this country of ours, where people from other countries are not welcomed they are only victims , killed and beaten-up until died. Lots and lots of high-jacking and killing. Even police are also in that danger of being killed, what is happening in Mzantsi. Soccer players used to have respect but now all that has changed, what I can say is I think the African government has just made embarrassment, they must give-up, because now they are oughting about who is going to be the president and exposed each other ( dirty cases). We are suppose to learn from them but now, they are giving us something else.

Thursday, May 15, 2008

Xenophobia : A serious issue



Xenophobic attacks leave 12 dead in SA

Members of the Alexandra Township community gather yesterday to listen to their leaders after xenophobia attacks on Zimbabwe immigrants by South AfricansJOHANNESBURG: An attack on a community of foreigners in Johannesburg has left two people dead and 40 people injured, a police spokeswoman said yesterday.“They were blaming the foreign nationals for (high levels of) crime,” said Johannesburg Constable Maria Malefetse.A mob attacked foreign residents of the Alexandra township on Sunday night, breaking into their shacks and demanding they move out of the area.“They threw stones at these people, shot at them, whipped some of them ... and robbed them. They say the foreigners rob them on the streets. All the victims were either from Malawi, Mozambique or Zimbabwe,” Inspector Simon Maphakela told The Star newspaper.Two people were shot and killed during the unrest, a South African and an unidentified man.The Zimbabwe Exiles Forum (ZEF) condemned the attack and called on the South African government to take action against increasing violence against foreigners.“We are asking the South African government to some thing about this because it is spiralling out of control,” said ZEF project leader Annah Moyo. “There is a general perception of foreign nationals as criminals, which is untrue.”Police arrested 12 people who will face charges relating to murder, attempted murder, theft, malicious damage to property and public violence.Two people were burnt to death and almost a thousand left homeless in March this year when a community of foreigners had their homes burnt down outside the capital Pretoria. For decades Africans have flocked to South Africa, the continent’s economic powerhouse, lured by abundant work in its mines, farms and homes and by one of the world’s most liberal immigration and refugee policies.Growing hostility towards this group threatens to damage South Africa’s relations with other African countries and handicap its buoyant economy, under strain from rising inflation, a shortage of skills and a power crisis.Many newcomers are being met with a cold shoulder and, in some cases, a clenched fist, according to relief workers and rights activists who have noted a rise in violence against foreign-born residents in the “Rainbow Nation”.“It’s clearly something that has got worse this year. These are general attacks on foreigners,” said Jack Redden, regional representative of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in Pretoria. “What has been really worrying is the violence that is attached to them.”It is unclear whether the rising cost of living and other economic jitters directly contribute to the violence. Fear of crime is generally given as the cause of attacks on foreigners, who are often blamed for murders, rapes and carjackings.Immigrants say they are frequently the victims of crimes and their complaints are beginning to get attention.Nigeria’s Senate last month considered a motion condemning attacks on its citizens in South Africa. South Africa’s government has acknowledged its concern about rising xenophobia within its borders and says it is taking steps to tackle the problem. – Agencies

Xenophobia Attacks :

Xenophobic attacks leave 2 dead in SA
Published: Tuesday, 13 May, 2008, 01:36 AM Doha Time
Members of the Alexandra Township community gather yesterday to listen to their leaders after xenophobia attacks on Zimbabwe immigrants by South AfricansJOHANNESBURG: An attack on a community of foreigners in Johannesburg has left two people dead and 40 people injured, a police spokeswoman said yesterday.“They were blaming the foreign nationals for (high levels of) crime,” said Johannesburg Constable Maria Malefetse.A mob attacked foreign residents of the Alexandra township on Sunday night, breaking into their shacks and demanding they move out of the area.“They threw stones at these people, shot at them, whipped some of them ... and robbed them. They say the foreigners rob them on the streets. All the victims were either from Malawi, Mozambique or Zimbabwe,” Inspector Simon Maphakela told The Star newspaper.Two people were shot and killed during the unrest, a South African and an unidentified man.The Zimbabwe Exiles Forum (ZEF) condemned the attack and called on the South African government to take action against increasing violence against foreigners.“We are asking the South African government to some thing about this because it is spiralling out of control,” said ZEF project leader Annah Moyo. “There is a general perception of foreign nationals as criminals, which is untrue.”Police arrested 12 people who will face charges relating to murder, attempted murder, theft, malicious damage to property and public violence.Two people were burnt to death and almost a thousand left homeless in March this year when a community of foreigners had their homes burnt down outside the capital Pretoria. For decades Africans have flocked to South Africa, the continent’s economic powerhouse, lured by abundant work in its mines, farms and homes and by one of the world’s most liberal immigration and refugee policies.Growing hostility towards this group threatens to damage South Africa’s relations with other African countries and handicap its buoyant economy, under strain from rising inflation, a shortage of skills and a power crisis.Many newcomers are being met with a cold shoulder and, in some cases, a clenched fist, according to relief workers and rights activists who have noted a rise in violence against foreign-born residents in the “Rainbow Nation”.“It’s clearly something that has got worse this year. These are general attacks on foreigners,” said Jack Redden, regional representative of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in Pretoria. “What has been really worrying is the violence that is attached to them.”It is unclear whether the rising cost of living and other economic jitters directly contribute to the violence. Fear of crime is generally given as the cause of attacks on foreigners, who are often blamed for murders, rapes and carjackings.Immigrants say they are frequently the victims of crimes and their complaints are beginning to get attention.Nigeria’s Senate last month considered a motion condemning attacks on its citizens in South Africa. South Africa’s government has acknowledged its concern about rising xenophobia within its borders and says it is taking steps to tackle the problem. – Agencies

Xenophobia Attacks :

Xenophobic attacks leave 2 dead in SA
Published: Tuesday, 13 May, 2008, 01:36 AM Doha Time
Members of the Alexandra Township community gather yesterday to listen to their leaders after xenophobia attacks on Zimbabwe immigrants by South AfricansJOHANNESBURG: An attack on a community of foreigners in Johannesburg has left two people dead and 40 people injured, a police spokeswoman said yesterday.“They were blaming the foreign nationals for (high levels of) crime,” said Johannesburg Constable Maria Malefetse.A mob attacked foreign residents of the Alexandra township on Sunday night, breaking into their shacks and demanding they move out of the area.“They threw stones at these people, shot at them, whipped some of them ... and robbed them. They say the foreigners rob them on the streets. All the victims were either from Malawi, Mozambique or Zimbabwe,” Inspector Simon Maphakela told The Star newspaper.Two people were shot and killed during the unrest, a South African and an unidentified man.The Zimbabwe Exiles Forum (ZEF) condemned the attack and called on the South African government to take action against increasing violence against foreigners.“We are asking the South African government to some thing about this because it is spiralling out of control,” said ZEF project leader Annah Moyo. “There is a general perception of foreign nationals as criminals, which is untrue.”Police arrested 12 people who will face charges relating to murder, attempted murder, theft, malicious damage to property and public violence.Two people were burnt to death and almost a thousand left homeless in March this year when a community of foreigners had their homes burnt down outside the capital Pretoria. For decades Africans have flocked to South Africa, the continent’s economic powerhouse, lured by abundant work in its mines, farms and homes and by one of the world’s most liberal immigration and refugee policies.Growing hostility towards this group threatens to damage South Africa’s relations with other African countries and handicap its buoyant economy, under strain from rising inflation, a shortage of skills and a power crisis.Many newcomers are being met with a cold shoulder and, in some cases, a clenched fist, according to relief workers and rights activists who have noted a rise in violence against foreign-born residents in the “Rainbow Nation”.“It’s clearly something that has got worse this year. These are general attacks on foreigners,” said Jack Redden, regional representative of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in Pretoria. “What has been really worrying is the violence that is attached to them.”It is unclear whether the rising cost of living and other economic jitters directly contribute to the violence. Fear of crime is generally given as the cause of attacks on foreigners, who are often blamed for murders, rapes and carjackings.Immigrants say they are frequently the victims of crimes and their complaints are beginning to get attention.Nigeria’s Senate last month considered a motion condemning attacks on its citizens in South Africa. South Africa’s government has acknowledged its concern about rising xenophobia within its borders and says it is taking steps to tackle the problem. – Agencies

Xenophobia Attacks :

Xenophobic attacks leave 2 dead in SA
Published: Tuesday, 13 May, 2008, 01:36 AM Doha Time
Members of the Alexandra Township community gather yesterday to listen to their leaders after xenophobia attacks on Zimbabwe immigrants by South AfricansJOHANNESBURG: An attack on a community of foreigners in Johannesburg has left two people dead and 40 people injured, a police spokeswoman said yesterday.“They were blaming the foreign nationals for (high levels of) crime,” said Johannesburg Constable Maria Malefetse.A mob attacked foreign residents of the Alexandra township on Sunday night, breaking into their shacks and demanding they move out of the area.“They threw stones at these people, shot at them, whipped some of them ... and robbed them. They say the foreigners rob them on the streets. All the victims were either from Malawi, Mozambique or Zimbabwe,” Inspector Simon Maphakela told The Star newspaper.Two people were shot and killed during the unrest, a South African and an unidentified man.The Zimbabwe Exiles Forum (ZEF) condemned the attack and called on the South African government to take action against increasing violence against foreigners.“We are asking the South African government to some thing about this because it is spiralling out of control,” said ZEF project leader Annah Moyo. “There is a general perception of foreign nationals as criminals, which is untrue.”Police arrested 12 people who will face charges relating to murder, attempted murder, theft, malicious damage to property and public violence.Two people were burnt to death and almost a thousand left homeless in March this year when a community of foreigners had their homes burnt down outside the capital Pretoria. For decades Africans have flocked to South Africa, the continent’s economic powerhouse, lured by abundant work in its mines, farms and homes and by one of the world’s most liberal immigration and refugee policies.Growing hostility towards this group threatens to damage South Africa’s relations with other African countries and handicap its buoyant economy, under strain from rising inflation, a shortage of skills and a power crisis.Many newcomers are being met with a cold shoulder and, in some cases, a clenched fist, according to relief workers and rights activists who have noted a rise in violence against foreign-born residents in the “Rainbow Nation”.“It’s clearly something that has got worse this year. These are general attacks on foreigners,” said Jack Redden, regional representative of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in Pretoria. “What has been really worrying is the violence that is attached to them.”It is unclear whether the rising cost of living and other economic jitters directly contribute to the violence. Fear of crime is generally given as the cause of attacks on foreigners, who are often blamed for murders, rapes and carjackings.Immigrants say they are frequently the victims of crimes and their complaints are beginning to get attention.Nigeria’s Senate last month considered a motion condemning attacks on its citizens in South Africa. South Africa’s government has acknowledged its concern about rising xenophobia within its borders and says it is taking steps to tackle the problem. – Agencies